BBA 1st Year Business Ethics Gandhian Philosophy of Wealth Management Long Question Answer

BBA 1st Year Business Ethics Gandhian Philosophy of Wealth Management Long Question Answer : BBA Gandhian Philosophy of Wealth Management : Philosophy of Trusteeship, Gandhi’s Seven Greatest Social sins Study Material Notes Questions With Answer Paper in English.

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BBA 1st Year Business Ethics Gandhian Philosophy of Wealth Management Long Question Answer
BBA 1st Year Business Ethics Gandhian Philosophy of Wealth Management Long Question Answer

Section-C (Long Answer Questions) (BBA Notes)

Q.1. Enumerate seven deadly sins propounded by Gandhiji.

Or Write a detailed note on Gandhiji seven greatest social sins. (2012)

Or Describe the GandhijFs seven greatest social sins. (2013)

Ans. Mahatma Gandhi said that seven things will destroy us. Notice that all of them have to do with social and political conditions. Also note that the learning of each of these “deadly sins” is an open external standard or something that is based on natural principles and laws, not on social values.

(1) Wealth without Work.

(2) Pleasure without Conscience.

(3) Knowledge without Character.

(4) Commerce (Business) Without Morality (Ethics).

(5) Science without Humanity.

(6) Religion without Sacrifice.

(7) Politics without Principle.

The Seven Habits nd Principle-centered Leadership are registered trademarks of Franklin Covey and are used with permission:

Wealth Without Work : This refers to the practice of getting something for nothing – manipulating markets and assets so that you don’t have to work or produce added value, just manipulate people and things. This includes playing the stock market; gambling; sweat-shop slavery; over-estimating one’s worth, like some heads of corporations drawing exorbitant salaries which are not always commensurate with the work they do. Gandhiji’s idea originatesfrom the ancient Indian practice of Tenant Farmers (Zamindari). The poor were made to slog on the farms while the rich raked in the profits. With capitalism and materialism spreading so rampantly around the world, the grey area between an honest day’s hard work and sitting back and profiting from other people’s labour is growing wider. To conserve the resources of the world and share these resources equitably with all so that everyone can aspire to a good standard of living, Gandhi believed people should take only as much as they honestly need. The United States provides a typical example. The country spends an estimated $200 billion a year on manufacturing cigarettes, alcohol and allied products which harm people’s health. What the country spends in terms of providing medical and research facilities to provide and find cures for health hazards caused by over-indulgence in tobacco and alcohol is mind-blowing. There is enough for everyone’s need but not for everyone’s greed, says Gandhi.

Pleasure Without Conscience :Pleasure without conscience is one of the key temptations for today’s executives. This is also connected to wealth without work. People find imaginative and dangerous ways of bringing excitement to their otherwise dull lives. Their search for pleasure and excitement often ends up costing society very heavily. Taking drugs and playing dangerous games cause avoidable health problems that cost the world hundreds of billions of dollars in direct and indirect health care facilities. Many of these problems are self-induced or ailments caused by careless attitudes. The United States spends more than $250 billion on leisure activities while 25 million children die each year because of hunger, malnutrition, and lack of medical facilities. Irresponsible and unconscionable acts of sexual pleasure and indulgence also cost the people and the country very heavily. Not only do young people lose their childhood but innocent babies are brought into the world and often left to the care of the society. The emotional, financial, and moral price is heavy on everyone.

Bu mess Ethics
Gandhi believed pleasure must come from within the soul and excitement from serving the needy, from caring for the family, the children, and relatives. Building sound human relationships can be an exciting and adventurous activity. Unfortunately, we ignore the spiritual pleasures of life and indulge in the physical pleasures which are “pleasure without conscience.”

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